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the "washington post." exposes detailed much that we did not know before about the reach of america's intelligence agencies into the lives of ordinary non-terrorist, non-suspicious people living in this country. the way u.s. intelligence can and does track our phone calls, our e-mails, virtually all of it all the time. laura poitras and glenn greenwald have done this reporting based on classified documents, who has temporary asylum in russia. it is laura poitras and glenn greenwald who know what their source has to tell. it's they who have been telling his story, making news out of the documents he's given to them week after week now since june. yeah, their source may be in russia now, but they're not.
poitras along with reporting from the "washington post." exposes detailed much that we did not know before about the
after dr. king delivered his i have a dream speech, washington and the world will reflect on the work still to be done. meantime, the u.s. and the world allies let syria know that chemical attacks will not be tolerated. we'll get the latest on what kind of military strike could punish assad without somehow swaying the country's civil war. those realities weigh heavily on president obama today when he marks the dream anniversary, honoring the legacy of nonviolence on the eve of an expected u.s.-led military strike. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, august 28th, 2013. this "the daily rundown," i'm chuck todd. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. today is the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. of course dr. martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech before a crowd of a quarter million people in washington and millions more on television watched on that 1963 day. his remarks galvanized the civil rights movement. president obama called it one of the five greatest speeches in american history. >> when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet
on washington with those who lived it. >>> yesterday tens of thousands of americans converged on the nation's capital to commemorate the 50 th anniversary of the 1963 march on washington. it was a historic event that spurred the enactment of the civil rights and voting rights act and one that is now remembered as one of the moral high points of american history. but that is not what political leaders, major media outlets and millions of everyday americans were expecting right up until that march began in 1963. they were bracing for violence and chaos. they were fearing strident and inflammatory rhetoric and they were convinced the main effect of the rally would be to inflict a grievous wound, maybe even a fatal wound, on a very movement it sought to advance. that is the context in which the march took place 50 years ago this week. context that can and all too often is lost to history. it came at a particularly crucial and politically sensitive time in the civil rights movement. three months before the march, in may of 1963, demonstrations in birmingham -- excuse me, demonstrators in birming
of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> good morning from washington. it's friday august 23, 2013. i'm chuck todd. this is a special edition of "the daily rundown." we're looking ahead to the 50th anniversary of that famous 1963 march on washington. for many americans, 50 years ago feels like yesterday. but of course for millions of others, including myself who weren't even born yet, in an ironic way, the grand memorial of granite and marble that now stands might make that history feel more distant. particularly for many young people today. we remember dr. king's march as an historical event. through grainy film and archive photos. but for each of us, those four words, "i have a dream," have a different and special renaissanreno sans. since then, every political protest in this country has borrowed from what the leaders of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were able to achieve. tomorrow, thousands will retrace their steps. next week, president obama will mark the 50th anniversary of the march with a speech on the steps of the lincoln memorial. i
. ♪ >>> welcome back to a special edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington: the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton continuing our special coverage live from the lincoln memorial on the national mall. 50 years ago, the eyes of the nation were on this spot where hundreds of thousands of people converged on history. people of all races from all walks of life joining hands in the name of justice and civil rights. in this hour, we'll hear from some of the people who traveled so far to attend this march. including the young girl shown in this iconic photo. i'll talk to her now 50 years later about how the march changed her life. we also have my interview with congressman john lewis from the steps of lincoln memorial where he spoke a half a century ago. i'm honored to begin the second hour of our show tonight with bernie a. king, ceo of the king center. thank you for being here today. >> thank you. glad to be here. >> you head the king center where your mother founded many years ago. and you have struggled and worked to keep the legacy of your mother and father alive. an
to make the first march on washington and i never really got over that until president obama said please lead us in the invocation, and that was in january of this year. thank you reverend sharpton and others for asking me to lend a few words to this most precious gatheri gathering as i look out at the crowd, i find myself saying, what are we doing today? where have we come from? what has been accomplished and where do we go from this point forwa forward? i think of one theme that has been played over and over in the past few months and it's one that bring great controversy. stand your ground. and we can think of standing your ground in the negative, but i ask you today to flip that coin and make stand your ground a positive ring for all of us who believe in freedom and justice and equality, that we stand firm on the ground that we have already made and be sure that nothing is taken away from us because there are efforts to turn back the clock of freedom. and i ask you today will you allow that to happen? take the words "stand your ground" in a positive sense. stand your ground in terms
are coming, indeed. ron mott, thank you. "the washington post," as was recognized by the post itself this past weekend barely mentioned the reverend king speech because he was the last speaker. they had gone to to press and it was not really notable to a lot of reporters who were covering it here in washington, d.c. you've been following this from our bureau in washington. all of these reflections of history come together. identify talked to jesse jackson today and he said this is the moment where president obama needs to do what lbj did and set out a legislative mandate for the dream and that voting rights is a constitutional amendment. that's the focus. that and on economic injustice and equality. >> i think it also puts a spotlight on the relationship between presidents like kennedy or president obama and a leader like martin luther king. let's go back to reality. in the sprachk 1963 president kennedy did not want this march to happen. he thought it would get out of control. he thought it might have speakers like john lewis who would go in directions more radical. he kept his deta
washington. helping to kick off our special coverage, chris matthews, host of msnbc "hardball" is live in washington, d.c. at the lincoln memorial and where all of today's event will take place. chris, good morning. let's set the scene for everybody. as we understand the program for today, we have three presidents, a host and current and former future civil rights and leaders and politicians taking the stage. truly a diverse program but we all look back 50 years ago to those vivid images that still inspire today. >> thomas, this is going to be a hot day. it's not that hot. it's sweltering today but not as bad as it could get in washington. it's drizzling and may clear up. i expect there is heated rhetoric today. this country is divideded right now, heavily and sharply divided between the one reject an african-american president and rejected him from the day he was elected and the day they heard he might be elected. the other half of the country almost pouting with this illusion right now. gee whiz. why isn't this greater? pef an african-american president and things not happen
is. the sale of "the washington post" is a tricky matter for the si single reason it is an original source of knowing what you and i should know about. and that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "all in with chris hayes" starts right now. >>> good evening from new york. i am in for are the great chris hayes. tonight on "all in" the sale of "the washington post" yesterday to billionaire jeff besos. i have thoughts and even feelings about all this since i actually work there. that is coming up. also tonight president obama makes a return to phoenix to talk about the great american dream of owning your own home. i submit homeownership isn't for everybody. it shouldn't be tax deductible. but first, did anything really interesting happen where you worked yesterday? >> the "the post" has been sold to jeff besos. >> every graham, not the only everybody but at the top of "the washington post" company had the same reaction when they started to think about the possibility which was great surprise. it was good for "the post. "we knew we could keep "the post" alive. our aspiration
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
. >>> as dawn broke on washington, d.c., 50 years ago today, no one knew what to expect. dr. martin luther king, junior had been up most of the night in his room writing and rewriting the speech he was to give that day, though the most sub lime passage would never appear on that page. the earliest press reports that morning suggested that only about 25,000 people would show up. organizers of the march on washington for jobs and freedom were nervous. putting out fires, working behind the scenes to keep the collision behind the march in tact and preparing to channel the sea of humanity that they hoped to call forth. and then the buses and the trains came, and the people came with them by the thousands. and by that afternoon, more than 200,000 people, black and white spread out before the shadow of the great emancipator, disciplined and skeweding the spirit of solidarity. they listened to speakers one by one who called the nation to meet the demands that justice placed upon it, and about 2:40 in the afternoon, the last speaker rose to the lectern. some fretted the tv cameras would be gone by the t
"politicsnation" starts right now with reverend al sharpton live from washington, d.c. rev, that had to be one heck of a day in american history to be a part of that. >> no, i was very honored to be part of it. it was an exciting day, a great day. we're going to talk about it on "politicsnation," ed. and you did a great job saturday at the march. we really enjoyed you. you have a little preacher in you. >> i do. i haven't unleashed it all yet, rev. >> all right. all right. >> "politicsnation" starts right now here on msnbc. rev, take it away. >> all right. thank you, ed. thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, the dream lives on 50 years after dr. martin luther king jr. inspired the nation. america's first african-american president reminded us -- reminded all of us that today's economic inequities mean there's still much more work to do. i was there for the day's commemoration as some 100,000 people gathered to hear more than 200 speakers. everyone from former presidents, carter and clinton, to activists and civil rights leaders. at points there was a spontaneous song
-perry. live this morning from washington, d.c. where thousands of people turned out to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom yesterday. only one man who spoke from the steps of the lincoln memorial five decades ago remains alive today, congressman john lewis, and he spoke forcefully. >> i got arrested 40 times during the '60s, beaten, left bloody and unconscious. but i'm not tired, i'm not weary. i'm not prepared to sit down and give up. i am ready to fight and continue the fight, and you must fight. >> although the architect of the march has passed away, many of the inequities that prompted the struggle remain firmly in place. in 1963 the march called for equal access to jobs, fair wages, unfettered voting rights and intraracial segregation, access to decent health care, schools, housing. half a century later the struggle continues. the struggle continues for decent work and humane conditions that pays a living wage of the nationwide unemployment rate is 7.4%. for african-americans it's 12.6%. for young african-american men between 20 and 24 the u
jeff bezos. >> everybody at the top of the "washington post" company had the same reaction when we first started to think about the possibility, which was great surprise. the reason we started to think about it is the point of our ownership was it was always supposed to be good for the post. we knew we could keep the post alive. we knew it could survive. but our aspirations for the most have always been hired by that. so we went to see if we could find a buyer. i have spent 42 years of my life working in this building. basically all of my working career. and i'm really devoted to its future and success. >> that's don graham. don graham is the grandson of eugene meyer, who bought the "washington post" in 1933. he's the son of -- he now runs the "washington post" company. he loves the company. he's an amazing, amazing leader. that's don graham saying he's selling the newspaper his family built to amazon founder jeff bezos and he's doing it. he's doing it because he thinks it is necessary for the institution to thrive because the business model that was built around that paper, around
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
, that change does not come from washington. but to washington. that change has always been built on our willingness, we, the people, to take on the mantle of citizenship. you are marching. and that is the lesson of our past. that is the promise of tomorrow. governor martin o'malley, democrat from maryland. and congresswoman marsha fudge, democrat from ohio and the chair of the congressional black caucus. thank you both for coming on tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> governor o'malley, a powerful day, first of all. >> it was tremendous. >> and there is work to do. >> absolutely. and a lot of this work is happening in states and sadly some of the examples are states that are going backwards. but there's other states like my own state of maryland where even in this recession, we've done the things that advance the cause of justice that are also good for creating jobs. we were named by the u.s. chamber number one for innovation and entrepreneurship and we also have the highest minority business goals. highest womens -- number of women-owned firms starting new business. t
memorial in washington, d.c., where we all try to advance the dream. >>> good evening from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in," as the struggle for low-wage employees continues, fast food worker strikes demanding higher wages spread across the country. my guess tonight is the former ceo of mcdonald's, who says raising the minimum wage will kill jobs. i disagree, and that's coming up. >>> also tonight, this weekend we commemorate the 50th anniversary on the civil rights march on washington. tonight, a look at a half century of racial progress. how far we have come and how far we have yet to go. >>> but we begin tonight with president obama, who just a few hours ago completed the last of four speeches in two days about something that is increasing the source of high anxiety for middle class families, the cost of higher education. >> over the last three decades, the cost of higher education has gone up 260% at a time when family incomes have gone up about 16%. >> the president may have been slightly understating just how bad it is. while the cost of a private non-profit four-ye
of dictator throwing thunder bolts out of the sky in washington. he's not. this is a federal system and that means the states are involved. and that's as it should be. and i think more power to him -- or more kudos to had him for wanting to do it that way. some states are participating in the health care markets. some are not. the feds will do it if the states don't. on immigration, there's a role for the states and i think it is going to be an ecpabded role for the states in any kind of reform. on health care, the interesting thing to me is that the business -- a lot of the business community wants obama care to go through. by business community, i mean hospitals, insurers, health care networks, they want more customers. so they went to this republican red state governor and said, you know what? this is pro business. be for it. and she was. >> i think to howard's point, the notion that no good deed goes unpunished. jan brewer is expanding the medical roles which i think is a very good move. there's very little that i think jan brewer does that's good. this is a good thing. low-inco
. >> announcer: from nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television program, this is "meet the press." >>> straight to the breaking news. a heavy security presence in cairo, egypt, this morning as military rulers are trying to strengthen their control over a country descending into chaos. so, how much worse will it get in egypt? hundreds are dead, nearly 40 christian churches have been torched and looted, and supporters of the ousted president morsi, the muslim brotherhood, are vowing to fight back. we'll have a live report coming up from cairo in just a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in lig
a moment, but back here in washington, the critical question is, are u.s. taxpayers, in effect, footing the bill for the continuing violence? joining me now, two members of the senate armed services committee, democrat jack reed of rhode island and republican kelly ayotte of new hampshire. senators, welcome to you both. senator ayotte, straight to you. several weeks ago, this question came up -- should we keep the u.s. aid flowing to egypt? you said yes then. have you had a change of heart now? >> well, i think, david, in light of recent actions, we tried to give some time to the administration. they obviously tried to get the military government to not crack down in a violent way, to restore democracy, to move to elections, to release political prisoners. they have ignored all of those requests. and now with the recent violent crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. i believe it must be suspended because, unfortunately, i think the military's gotten the impression, and particularly with what the president not asking for aid to be suspended when he spoke this week, that whateve
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
in washington, d.c., where events are already underway for the 50th anniversary march on washington. thousands of people are gathered here already, with more continuing to stream in. among those scheduled to speak today are martin luther king iii, merly evers williams, the reverend al sharpton, attorney general eric holder, and john lewis. the only person to speak at the original march who is still alive today. here he is in 1963. >> by the forces of our demand, our determination, and our numbers, we shall splinter the segregated south into a thousand pieces and put them together in the image of god and democracy. we must say, wake up, america! wake up! for we cannot stop and we will not and cannot be patient. >> on that day, 50 years ago, 250,000 people gathered here to demand the rights of full citizens. they demanded comprehensive civil rights legislation, school desegregation, full employment, living wages, and the aggressive use of federal authority to ensure economic political and social justice. 50 years later, we have made progress, was the struggle continues for those same demands. we
a better time for this march on washington. heather headley has finished singing. here comes the president. [ cheers and applause ] >> to the king family, who have sacrificed and inspired so much, to president clinton, president carter, vice president biden, jill, fellow americans. five decades ago today americans came to this honored place to lay claim to a promise made at our founding. we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. in 1963, almost 200 years after those words were set to paper, a full century after a great war was fought and emancipation proclaimed, that promise, those truths remained unmet. and so they came by the thousands from every corner of our country, men and women, young and old, blacks who longed for freedom and whites who could no longer accept freedom for themselves while witnessing the subjugation of others. across the land congregations sent them off with food and with prayer. in the middle of the
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
this country and to mark the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the good saturday afternoon to you, everyone. i am craig melvin coming live from the feet of the lincoln memorial continuing our coverage. we heard speech from civil rights and political leaders ranging from attorney general eric holder of course here and house speaker -- house minority leader nancy pelosi and the families of trayvon martin and of course martin luther king iii scheduled to join us at some point here over the next hour or so, and again right now thousands about to start retracing the steps that marchers took 50 years ago. so has peter alexander who is along the march route and let me start with you. what is the scene like right now? >> so right now we're along the route on independence avenue and you can see the police are clearing the way as they arrive here at the martin luther king memorial. we are joined by so many people who witnessed history as we wait to see those who participated in it, one of those voices is the gentleman i met today named franklin delano, no roosevelt, but williams. you
to go down fighting. >>> also said founder of amazon to buy "the washington post." what does that mean for the floundering legacy of the paper? the panel will weigh in on that. yes! one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues... with three strains of good bacteria. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. the beach on your tv is much closer than it appears. seize the summer with up to 50% off hotels at travelocity. there's a new way to fight litter box odor. introducing tidy cats with glade tough odor solutions. two trusted names, one amazing product. my electrolux french door refrigerator gives me a lot more entertaining possibilities. with features like the perfect temp drawer that has a wide variety of temperature settings, i can store anything from desserts to deliciously fresh seafood at the ideal serving temperature. so everything is perfectly fresh. tonight i'm using the just the two of us setting. electrolux. be even more amazing. see the electrolux kitchen and laundry appliance collection at the home depot today. >>
but is it just a ploy to sell books? >>> should marijuana be decriminalized. it is in washington state. >>> and i'm abby huntsman. how do people feel about men and women in power, like their bosses? we'll report how men and women see men and women in power on "the cycle" on august 19th, 2013. ♪ >>> shout out to carol king. we begin with egypt as america focuses on that $1.5 billion in aid we give egypt each year. more than 800 people are confirmed dead since wednesday. that number is expected to go higher. adding the potential for more unrest is this. hosni mubarak might be released while awaiting trial. over the weekend, 25 off-duty egyptian policemen were executed in an ambush. also, 36 prisoners were killed while in custody. there are varying accounts as to what happened there. we're going to take a two-pronged approach. first, the international implications and then the domestic, political side of it here in america. for that we have two people who know. former white house mideast adviser, ambassador mark ginsburg. for the politics of it all, dana millbank. first to you, am
want a friend in washington, get a dog. president obama did so this week with the addition of sunny, another portuguese water dog, companion to bo and one of the few bright spots in the dog days of summer. joining me today, correspondent for "the guardian" anna marie cox and former director of speech writing for the president -- i can't get the words out, i'm so excited, columnist for the daily beast and co-founder of fenway strategies, jon favreau and "washington post" columnist and msnbc political columnist eugene robinson. joining us now is chuck todd who is also, of course, host of msnbc's "the daily rundown." before we get into the actual policy here, i want to talk about the sort of bird's-eye view as far as what the president is doing on this great middle class tour if you will. to me it seems like he's trying to build up as much political capital as possible before he gets back to washington. what do you think he's trying to do? >> i think he's trying to talk about what people around kitchen tables are talking about, right? this has been the great disconnect of washington, s
. getting ready for the 50th anniversary of the march on washington, "the new york times" website today posted that paper's original coverage, their coverage in the paper from the day that the march happened, back in 1963. and, of course, what's funny about the coverage, looking back on it now. funny/creepy/funny/creepy is how obsessed "the times" was and ow obsessed all of the mainstream media was. how relevant it felt to point out over and over again how nice the whole thing was. this emphasis is out of control. "it was an orderly washington rally." "the leaders of march called on congress with courtesy." "congress responded cordially." "it was an occupying army of marchers on washington, but it was polite." "politeness is the order of the day." "even the traffic control worked smoothly." "disorders were at a minimum." "only four arrested, including a nazi." oh, see, only the nazis were getting arrested. that was a fine day for a walk to the national mall. it is sometimes easier to see in history than it is up close while stuff is happening. but tactics matter in politics. strategy ma
forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. ♪ >> people of all races, regular people from all walks of life, marching against injustice, marching to change history. >> we are the moral revolution. >> how long? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to ask and a call for peace. a word that inspired a people, a nation and the entire world. >> free at least, free at least. thank god almighty we are free at least. >> tonight a special hour-hour toll particulars nation. the march on washington. the dream continues. >>> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. first years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am right now watching history. millions more watching at home, seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement. call for justice and equality. i talked to him from the exact spot where he can spoke 50 years ago. and we'll hear some of the young people who traveled hundreds of miles to help change the course of history. i'm honored to begin the show tonight with martin luther king iii and reverend joseph lowry
anniversary of the march on washington for jobs and freedom. in 1963, more than 200,000 people of all ages, races, sexes, and sexual orientations gathered here peacefully, or, orderly, as the press reported it back then, right where i'm sitting today. i'm honored to be joined by this afternoon by some of the people who helped make that an historic day, as well as some of the people who continued dr. king's work, as we honor the past and we look forward. but first, a look at the present. one of those continuing dr. king's work is his son, dr. martin luther king iii, reflecting earlier on how much work we still have to do to achieve his father's vision from 50 years ago. let's take a listen. >> the vision preached by my father a half century ago was that his four little children would one day live in a nation where they would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. however, sadly, the tears of trayvon martin's mother and father remind us that far too frequently, the color of one's skin remains a license to profile, to arrest, and to even murder with n
-run business, the grahams are selling "the washington post" to amazon's ceo jeff bezos seen here deal making at a media summit last month in sun valley. but can the king of dotcom save print? >> we knew we could keep the "post" alive. we knew it could survive. but our aspirations for the "post" have always been higher by that. >> this is going to shake things up. >>> good day, i'm andrea mitchell in washington. nearly 100 u.s. government personnel flew out of yemen today on a c-17 air force cargo plane. leaving only a kel stal emergenskeletal emergency staff behind because of what the state department is calling the extremely high threat level. th all of this comes after the interception of al qaeda communications threatening major attacks on u.s. interests. joining me now from new york, nbc's ama, but richard, first to you. you just finished interviewing john mccain there in cairo. what is he saying about the situation in egypt and the threat level in neighboring yemen? >> reporter: i just left the senator a couple of minutes ago. i was afraid i wasn't going to get to your show in time. he
over. ♪ >> mr. obama is back in washington. his response to the crisis in egypt continues to come under fire. >> for us to sit by and watch this happen is a violation of everything that we stood for. >> the administration is not signaling any major shift in policy. >> we're going to have a bill in egypt and have to sus. end our aid. >> it shows nothing but american weakness. >> i don't knowian senator paul is so out of wac about this. >> this all started with him say wiig don't have room for libertarian republicans. the party's big enough for both of us. >> stop, question frisk have made new york city the safest big city. >> stop and frick is abandoned will, people die? >> no question, violent crime will go up. violence is happening disproportionately enough of minority communities. >> it's a slippery slope. >> like burning down the house to rid it of mice. ♪ we open a new week with the president back in d.c. after a family vacation on martha's vineyard facing questions how his administration will handle two vital concerns to the nation. internationally, there's still a question of ho
bates. and congressional reporter, sahil kapur. joining me from washington is nbc justice correspondent pete williams. pete, you talked recently about the march on washington. why don't you tell us about that. >> reporter: washington, d.c., in the summer of 1963 was more than a little nervous about the prospect of a big civil rights march coming to the city, and that worry extended from the president on down, a fear that if it went badly, it could derail the efforts to pass the nation's most important civil rights law. ♪ it's easy to see now why the march on washington is celebrated as a landmark in the civil rights movement. it helped to shape public opinion after decades of struggle, says todd perdom, author of a forth coming book about that period. >> i think it's probably the single most important public demonstration in america of any kind. >> reporter: america in 1963 was deeply segregated. something as simple as taking the bus meant separate waiting rooms for blacks. in the spring the nation had watched as police in birmingham, alabama, aimed fire hoses and set dogs on children
that changed america forever. the march on washington. august 28th, 1963. people of all races, regular people from all walks of life marching against injustice, marching to change history. a day when the voices of the movement echoed across america. >> we are of a massive moral revolution. >> how long can we be patient? we want our freedom and we want it now. >> a call to action and a call for peace. the words that inspired a people, a nation, and the entire world. >> free at last, free at last, thank god almighty we are free at last. >> tonight, a special two-hour edition of "politicsnation." the march on washington. the dream continues. >> good evening. i'm al sharpton live from the lincoln memorial here on the national mall. 50 years ago hundreds of thousands of people stood where i am. right now watching history. millions more watching at home seeing the leaders of the civil rights movement, call for justice and equality. powerful speeches and powerful music from singers like lahalia jackson, bob dylan. tonight we'll hear those voices. we'll also hear from congressman john lewis. i talk t
>>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" live from washington, d.c. it's the last ed show on a saturday. let's get to work. >>> i have a dream today! >> the dream can only be realized if we pay attention to what's going on in our own backyard. >> you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way! make some noise! >> you cannot have economic and political equality without having some form of social equality. >> stand tall in your community, fight for diversity, understand its strength. >> and i don't think our society will rise to its full maturity until we come to see that men are made to live together as brothers. >> 50 years later, we need a team effort to make his dream come true. >> their march is now our march. >> so on the anniversary of the march on washington, our grandchildren will not be fighting the same fight. >> we must give our young people dreams again. >> i have a dream that we shall overcome. >> i stand here today in this sacred place, in my father's footsteps. >> my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will n
indicate military attacks are coming. >>> anniversary of the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. how president obama handles the hopes of the joshua generation. >>> plus as debt and a sense of despair looms large over motown, detroit's next mayor will be former hospital chief mike duggin or the man we'll meet this morning, wayne county sheriff benny napoleon. august 27th, this is "the daily rundown." lets get to my first reads of the morning. secretary of state john kerry laid out an aggressive case for intervention in syria arking evidence of the largest chemical attack in decades is undeniable. the latest escalation with a steady drum beat by the united states and its allies, which is clearly a leadup to military action. >> the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity. president obama has made clear to the outside regime that this international norm cannot be violated without consequences. >> it's an important phrase. you heard it a lot, not just from john kerry but jay carney, international norm, significant, ready for str
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
on washington from august 1963. martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech. the conservative media in our country, mostly yesterday, tried to pretend that anniversary was not happening. they spent last night complaining bitterly there were no republicans on stage a the 50th anniversary event. republicans weren't invited. today was the day when the conservative media finally bothered to fwogoogle the thing they were complaining about after the fact to realize tons of republicans were invited to be on the stage at the march on washington, it's just that every single one of them said no. the first president bush said no for health reasons. the second president bush said no also presumably for health reasons. jeb bush said no as well, because i don't know. as did john boehner. as did republican house majority leader eric cantor who has been trying to reinvent himself as the republican vaguely friendly toward sieve rights. eric cantor this year marched with john lewis at the re-enactment of the selma march at the edmund pettus bridge. he's been trying to improve his image on civil rights. when
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